Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design

It is in our nature to look at other people’s work, to learn and to analyze. Learn by taking tours of other facilities, installing other people’s designs, and even when installing your own designs.

Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design
For one project, a client had a very difficult time nailing down a use case for a room. In part, it was because the organization had crafted many use cases spanning multiple disciplines. Each section of the organization had its own vision for the room, ranging from a space for a live event with a band, a banquet hall, and a video conference meeting room for 30 people.
Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design
For one project, a client had a very difficult time nailing down a use case for a room. In part, it was because the organization had crafted many use cases spanning multiple disciplines. Each section of the organization had its own vision for the room, ranging from a space for a live event with a band, a banquet hall, and a video conference meeting room for 30 people.

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Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design

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As a system designer, I am constantly looking at how others are designing systems. I want to see what I like, and what I don’t like, about someone else’s work.

When we look at different designs, it’s important to remember that there is likely a set of circumstances that led to a particular decision.

If we are all being honest, we all probably do this in our own respective fields. It is in our nature to look at other people’s work, to learn and to analyze. Even though this can often be coupled with judgement, it really is a good tool to see different perspectives.

I have learned a lot from taking tours of other facilities, along with installing other people’s designs, and even installing my own designs.

Generally speaking, I am usually not impressed.

Hindsight is always 20/20, and I often find myself thinking, “Why didn’t they (or I) just do ——- fill in the blank—-”. I know others have done this to me, but what we always forget is that there is always a back story. There is always a series of events that gives a lot of context to the decisions that were made, and that is what I want to focus on here.

I know we are not supposed to air our dirty laundry, but I want to outline some details about a few designs and give some context to them. I believe that the specificity of the examples is not what is important, but instead, the ability to start looking at other designs in a new context.

For one project, I designed a company’s conference room, for what turned out to be a difficult implementation. I eventually had to fix the system, but somehow managed to train the end user on that very system, before it was fully functional.

I felt the pain of that design all the way through, and by the end, every person from the project manager, lead installer, salesman, and my boss were upset with the outcome. I had to swallow my pride and work through all the issues one by one, until the system worked as intended.

The back story, in short, is that we were busy.

It sounds like an excuse, but it is also a valid reason.

As a designer for an AV firm, you have at any given point 10 jobs on your desk that are the top priority for each of those 10 clients.

Well, this one project ended up being one that had fallen through the cracks. Even worse, an install date was demanded, even though a design had yet to be completed.


More About Tom Noble
Tom Noble received his Bachelor of Science in Acoustics from Columbia College in Chicago. During college, he served as a researcher for the Army Corps of Engineers with a specific focus on Low-Frequency Propagation. After college, he owned his own company working with churches and other AV clients. One of his favorite jobs during that time was being able to design and build a recording studio in downtown Nashville. Shortly after, he worked for an integrator, doing work all over the country, specializing in DSP programming and tuning of rooms for many churches and large corporate clients. He is now the head AV design engineer for Lifeway Christian Resources in Nashville. He is married to his beautiful wife with an amazing son and beautiful little daughter.
Get in Touch: tom.noble@lifeway.com    More by Tom Noble

Latest Resource

For Lighting Design, What Software Is The Right Match For Your Needs? (Part 3)
Dig into this final part of a three-part series that looks into choices for lighting design software, including Vectorworks and LightConverse, and how each can best serve the needs of your church.


Article Topics

Visual Arts · Stage Design · Team Management · Budgeting · Leadership · Analyze · Camera · Designer · Goals · Implementation · Installing · All Topics

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