Mixing for Streaming: Aiming for Smooth, Consistent Broadcast Audio

If you have assembled your final mix from your FOH console or even a dedicated broadcast room, begin to study the recorded mix in as many types of listening spaces you expect your viewer to listen from.

Mixing for Streaming: Aiming for Smooth, Consistent Broadcast Audio
If you have assembled your final mix from your FOH console or even a dedicated broadcast room, begin to study the recorded mix in as many types of listening spaces you expect your viewer to listen from.
Credit: Todd Heft
Mixing for Streaming: Aiming for Smooth, Consistent Broadcast Audio
If you have assembled your final mix from your FOH console or even a dedicated broadcast room, begin to study the recorded mix in as many types of listening spaces you expect your viewer to listen from.
Credit: Todd Heft

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Technology Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.
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The ease at which your organization can get their content livestreaming, leaves us with a lot of media content awaiting an audience. You’ve gone out and got all the gear, such as great cameras, a switcher, cables, tripods, capture computers, and web encoders. In addition, you have your livestream license and have hooked up your audio.

The single biggest point of failure for video production, both live and in post, is audio.

Your video quality looks amazing, and you have incredibly creative video directors. You’re ready to rock, and may have been streaming for some time.

So what was that last piece you mentioned when you assembled your system? Oh yeah, audio.

The single biggest point of failure for video production, both live and in post, is audio. It’s often the most mishandled and last piece, particularly when working on video. Bad audio can also be the single biggest distraction when trying to hold a viewer’s attention to the media content.

Awhile back (July 15, 2016) I was able to write more in depth about the how-tos to assemble your broadcast mix from the same console you have to mix FOH from. In today’s article, I’m going to address two final steps before sending your broadcast audio off to join with its video counterpart.

Polishing Your Broadcast Mix

You’ve worked hard to get all your buses, matrixes, pan, EQ, and room mics all dialed in for a great sounding broadcast mix. Now we need to get it all into a final package to be delivered to broadcast.

There are just a few final touches here that we can do to step it up.

If you have assembled your final mix from your FOH console or even a dedicated broadcast room, begin to study the recorded mix in as many types of listening spaces you expect your viewer to listen from. For example, if your final mix is designed for livestreaming, listen to it from anything such as a laptop, tv speakers, cheap ear buds, home stereo speakers and in your car. If your final mix is designed to be played from another video campus, you need to go there, and listen to how it sounds on that PA.

Most of the time, your final mix from a controlled studio or your FOH headphones will not translate the same in other sources. The really good studio engineers in the recording business always take their mixes home to listen on other sources, and so should we as broadcast mixers. The only way we can know what needs to be adjusted is when we allow ourselves to become part of the audience.


More About Debbie Keough
Debbie Keough is currently a freelance audio engineer based in the Orange County area of Southern California. She has held FOH, lighting, media and technical director positions from the largest megachurches to smaller local churches. Additionally, she is an instructor at The Recording Arts Center in San Diego, California. She loves mixing and her heart is to teach, encourage and raise up the next generation of technical artists in the church. She can be reached on Instagram and Twitter @debbiekeough.
Get in Touch: debbiekeough1@gmail.com    More by Debbie Keough

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.


Article Topics

Technology · Audio · Streaming · Team Management · Leadership · Team Development · Volunteers · Broadcast · Console · Distortion · Engineers · Frequency · Livestream · All Topics

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