Service Planning: Best Brains, Best Storms

Once you have made your decisions, devise a system for explaining, sharing the vision and communicating the moments to the entire staff team. Avoid using email exclusively for such communication.

Service Planning: Best Brains, Best Storms
Multisite worship leaders are often positionally left out of the brainstorming mix, with the leaders of those meetings well aware that a church with 12 locations would not benefit from a brainstorming meeting with 20 to 30 people in the room. The problem with this, is that many times, a multisite church could benefit from the brainstorming process of a worship pastor out on the “front lines” of their church, in a location different than the original or largest site.
Service Planning: Best Brains, Best Storms
Multisite worship leaders are often positionally left out of the brainstorming mix, with the leaders of those meetings well aware that a church with 12 locations would not benefit from a brainstorming meeting with 20 to 30 people in the room. The problem with this, is that many times, a multisite church could benefit from the brainstorming process of a worship pastor out on the “front lines” of their church, in a location different than the original or largest site.

Service Planning News

Service Planning: Best Brains, Best Storms
Service Planning: Connecting the Birth and Resurrection
Service Planning: Jesus Was Born to Die! April Fool!
Service Planning: Look to the Ancient Church for Inspiration, Direction

Team Management Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.
·

One of the challenges that can show up in service planning, happens when the staff is placed in brainstorm meetings, exclusively based on their position within the organization. For example, it might be assumed that a worship pastor or arts director would be expected to attend, or perhaps even lead, a brainstorm meeting regarding weekend services.

Determine who the good brainstormers are, include them in your meetings, and then exclude the ones who do not like doing that.

In many cases, the artistic brain of a worship pastor is excited to be leading the charge to create worship services, and brainstorming is a function of that leader, casting their vision for how the service should look and feel. When the meeting contains a select few with a smaller staff, the brainstorms flow from the artistry of that individual.

This can get tricky though, as the church grows.

The larger your artistic staff is, the larger that brainstorm meeting is assumed to be. Many times, staff members will simply be added to the pool of meeting attendees, based entirely on their position, and few ask the question about what that staff member has to offer in terms of brainstorming (or if that is even one of their gifts). This happens when church creative staff grows to include video directors, graphic designers, tech staff, vocal team leaders, etc.

This also happens in a multisite environment that is growing. Multiple locations are often run by site-specific worship leaders, and those artists are assumed a seat at the brainstorming table.

Other times, multisite worship leaders are positionally left out of the brainstorming mix, with the leaders of those meetings well aware that a church with 12 locations would not benefit from a brainstorming meeting with 20 to 30 people in the room. The problem with this, is that many times, a multisite church could benefit from the brainstorming process of a worship pastor out on the “front lines” of their church, in a location different than the original or largest site.

What is brainstorming, but a primary gift of that particular worship pastor, and it’s going completely untapped, simply because of a particular pecking order?

The simple thing to do would be to determine who the good brainstormers are, include them in your meetings, and then exclude the ones who do not like doing that, or who do not demonstrate being gifted in that area.

This can present a problem, though, of lack of ownership.

If the person who is expected to make that moment happen didn’t participate in the brainstorm when it was invented, how will they know how to execute when Sunday arrives?


More About Eric Bramlett
Eric Bramlett has been the creative arts director for Community Christian Church in Naperville, Ill., since 1996. He is responsible for overseeing large-group experiences from initial artistic vision through production at all 12 CCC locations. He also promotes creative collaboration and artist reproduction for NewThing, CCC's international church-planting mission. Eric continues to be involved in the Chicago theatre scene, as an Artistic Advisor for Porchlight Music Theatre Chicago. He hosts a church media podcast for pastors at www.bigidearesources.com/podcast, and co-authored “The Big Idea,” with Dave and Jon Ferguson. Eric lives in Naperville with his wife, Kristi, and their three children, Sadie, Dillon and Anna. To contact Eric, you can email him or on Twitter @billshazzar.
Get in Touch: ericbramlett@communitychristian.org    More by Eric Bramlett

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.


Article Topics

Team Management · Leadership · Spiritual Health · Team Development · Volunteers · Artistry · Attendees · Brainstorming · Challenge · Creative Staff · Gifted · All Topics

Support and Enhance the Worship Message

The latest strategies for sound, lighting and facilities can help you better attract and engage with your congregation. With Worship Facilities’ insights on leadership, communication and administrative tools, each issue shows you how to design and maintain your facility and how to adapt it to meet the changing needs of today’s members.
Explore the success stories of others, and find ways to enhance your weekly services. Get a free subscription to Worship Facilities magazine.

Comments


Editor's Picks
©2018 WFX Network · A division of Informa · 1166 Avenue of the Americas, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10036 · All Rights Reserved.