The 4 Best Target Strategies for Getting the Most Out of Social Media

As consumers spend more time online, new types of behaviors are increasing, including connecting with friends, following brands, sharing contacts, all especially useful for a church strategy looking at outreach.

The 4 Best Target Strategies for Getting the Most Out of Social Media
Pay attention, ask congregants and community leaders which platforms, digital media types and applications ‘your’ people are most engaged in, and encourage this sharing behavior. This can translate to better community awareness, more interest in online offerings, as well as the range of traditional to newer interesting activities offered in all types of locations by your church.
The 4 Best Target Strategies for Getting the Most Out of Social Media
Pay attention, ask congregants and community leaders which platforms, digital media types and applications ‘your’ people are most engaged in, and encourage this sharing behavior. This can translate to better community awareness, more interest in online offerings, as well as the range of traditional to newer interesting activities offered in all types of locations by your church.

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2) The evolving usage of social media.

Stats say for social media users, one in every three minutes, is now spent on a mobile platform inside a social application.

As consumers spend more time online, new types of behaviors are increasing, including connecting with friends, following brands, sharing contacts, all especially useful for a church strategy looking at outreach.

As social media expands beyond its traditional uses, and people change how they use social media for entertainment, to research products, read news or fill moments in their day, we see passive social behaviors and networking continue to climb especially on mobile platforms and with younger demographics.

Pay attention, ask congregants and community leaders which platforms, digital media types and applications ‘your’ people are most engaged in, and encourage this sharing behavior. This can translate to better community awareness, more interest in online offerings, as well as the range of traditional to newer interesting activities offered in all types of locations by your church.

3) Trust and peer-to-peer engagement.

With personalization of social media, brands are seeing much more organic peer-to-peer engagement success.

As public trust is eroding, (it’s believed 85 percent of the public lacks faith in the system of government, and only 29 percent of the public trusts government officials), the power of peers, employees and family connected through social media is shifting how consumers make choices, who they trust and making fans and advocates more relevant than ever before.

Peer-to-peer influence is exploding. People are looking to people they know and trust as credible sources of information. Bloggers and the like in someone’s network have become just as credible as a source in forming an opinion or purchasing products than any type of expert.

We see companies and brands creating new partnerships with micro influencers and community engagement groups.

ESPN and NBC Universal recently partnered with Snapchat to produce new products for their content platform, at the same time Facebook is trying to partner with more independent content creators.

Look to partner with brands you use, companies you work with and influencers that can help connect you to more unique and specific groups. The good news is that churches may have an advantage here, in organically creating peer-to-peer sharing and community building, as this is the nature of what we do.


More About Keri Rafter
Keri Rafter is the Technical Director for Floris United Methodist Church, where she focuses on innovative and outside-the-box thinking to engage the church to be a catalyst for change. Keri looks for trends and shifts in culture that provide opportunities that can be turned into potential membership growth. She coaches churches and other organizations to have patience through the risk taking process of innovating and to have a diverse and inclusive focus. She is also a television director, producer, and managing principal of MediaKraft, a Washington D.C. area creative media production company.
Get in Touch: krafter@florisumc.org    More by Keri Rafter

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